Canadian. Age 20. Lydia Martin is my ginger queen and nothing will change that.

 

Anonymous asked
Hello. Are you ok? I mean, you suddenly stop writing here and I just wonder if you're fine. If you don't have time just say it please. I hope I'm wrong and you're perfectly fine =)

Everything’s okay, don’t worry! I had a ton of assignments and tests that were all due around the same time but they’re all done now! I’ve started on the 2nd chapter of Amalgamation so I’m hoping to have regular updates throughout the summer. I’m also working on an original manuscript at the same time and my computer went kaput on me so I’ve been borrowing my friend’s computer until I can get a replacement.

As for being on Tumblr I’ve been abstaining from it for a good reason and I’d rather lead a more positive outlook right now than be bogged down by pessimism.

deluxetoaster:

can we start a club for teenagers who were constantly complimented on their intelligence when they were younger and are now having trouble coping with the realization that they’re actually of average intellect at best

To fight monsters, we created monsters of our own.

Pacific Rim, 2013


One of the greatest things about this quote (and this movie) is that it had all the potential in the world to spread the dark and terrible (and often truthful) idea that in order to fight the darkness, one must absorb some of that darkness. It was very prominent in The Dark Knight trilogy, especially as articulated by Harvey Dent: “You die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.” 

Pacific Rim doesn’t do this. Mankind bands together for a true world war. There are already enough monsters coming for them; they do not need to become monstrous themselves. The monsters they create are not beasts but guards and armor to protect, not universally destroy. The jaegers rarely deliberately destroy massive structures (remember Gipsy Danger carefully stepping over a large walkway and nimbly navigating between buildings during the fight in Hong Kong). The pilots in the jaegers are very human and imperfect but are still heroes. They may have created monsters, but they did not become them.

Everyone and their mother has lauded this, but it bears repeating: in Pacific Rim, mankind’s power is not in its capacity for destruction or power or control or harnessing its deepest instincts but instead in its humanity—its ability to rebuild, to persevere, to empathize and to understand. 

(via mymarysunshine)